Tag Archives: Books

My 2018 Reading List

Back in 2016, a friend convinced me to get on Goodreads and I’ve been keeping careful track of my books ever since. Growing up, I’d keep track of the books I read over the summer, writing titles and authors in notebooks with rainbow gel pens. Times change. The lists below are in alphabetical order by title and grouped into nonfiction and fiction categories.

Nonfiction

21 Lessons for the 21st Century
Yuval Noah Harari

The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness
Epictetus

The Art of Loving (I admit, this was a re-read)
Erich Fromm

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
Atul Gawande

Beyond Religion: Ethics for a Whole World
The Dalai Lama

Building Peace: Living and Learning for a Better World
Rebecca M. Stein

The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money
Bryan Caplan

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human
Richard W. Wrangham

Cheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy
Mark Regnerus  

The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure
Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt

Code Girls: The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers Who Helped Win World War II
Liza Mundy

The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters
Thomas M. Nichols

The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life
Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson

The End of Epidemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It
Jonathan D. Quick

The Ethics of Identity
Kwame Anthony Appiah

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World–and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
Hans Rosling, Anna Rosling Rönnlund, Ola Rosling

The Fear Factor: How One Emotion Connects Altruists, Psychopaths, and Everyone In-Between
Abigail Marsh

The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully
Frank Ostaseski

Future Sex: A New Kind of Free Love
Emily Witt

The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility
Owen J. Flanagan

Getting Better: Why Global Development Is Succeeding–And How We Can Improve the World Even More
Charles Kenny

The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality
Angus Deaton

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
J.D. Vance

The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen
Kwame Anthony Appiah

How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
Michael Pollan

How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain
Lisa Feldman Barrett

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking
Jordan Ellenberg

How We Talk: The Inner Workings of Conversation
N.J. Enfield

I Will Survive: Personal gay, lesbian, bisexual & transgender stories in Singapore
Leow Yangfa

Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment
Francis Fukuyama

Inventing Human Rights: A History
Lynn Hunt

Is Shame Necessary?: New Uses for an Old Tool
Jennifer Jacquet

The Jew in Lotus: A Poet’s Rediscovery of Jewish Identity in Buddhist India
Rodger Kamenetz

The Jews of Islam
Bernard Lewis

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity
Kwame Anthony Appiah

Meditations
Marcus Aurelius

Mindwise: Why We Misunderstand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want
Nicholas Epley

The Monarchy of Fear: A Philosopher Looks at Our Political Crisis
Martha C. Nussbaum

Mothers and Others
Sarah Blaffer Hrdy

NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
Steve Silberman

Planetwalker: 22 Years of Walking. 17 Years of Silence.
John Francis

Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations
Amy Chua

The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence
Dacher Keltner

The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women
Kate Moore

The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World
Owen J. Flanagan

Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves
George M. Church and Ed Regis

Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
Geoffrey B. West

Sustainable Energy – Without the Hot Air
David J.C. MacKay

Theft by Finding: Diaries 1977-2002
David Sedaris

Triumph of the Heart: Forgiveness in an Unforgiving World
Megan Feldman Bettencourt

Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction
Maia Szalavitz

Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism
Ian Bremmer

Vanishing New York: How a Great City Lost Its Soul
Jeremiah Moss

The Way of the Bodhisattva
Santideva

Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter
Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values
Robert M. Pirsig

Fiction

China Rich Girlfriend – Kevin Kwan
A Clockwork Orange – Anthony Burgess
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki – Haruki Murakami
Corridor – Alifan Sa’at
The Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
Crazy Rich Asians – Kevin Kwan
Dance Dance Dance – Haruki Murakami
A Horse Walks into a Bar – David Grossman
A House Without Windows – Nadia Hashimi
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou
Kafka on the Shore – Haruki Murakami
LaRose – Louise Erdrich
Luncheon of the Boating Party – Susan Vreeland
The Night Circus – Erin Morgenstern
Norwegian Wood – Haruki Murakami
A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
The Round House – Louise Erdrich
South of the Border, West of the Sun – Haruki Murakami
Sputnik Sweetheart – Haruki Murakami
Strange Pilgrims – Gabriel García Márquez
Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe

Nothing tickling your fancy? Take a look at my lists from 2016 and 2017.

Wishing you peace this new year, in your mind and in your heart. Happy reading!

IMG_0387

Travel Guide: Santorini

One of the perks of being an international educator is the time and opportunity to travel. This October break, we scooted off to Greece! (Literally – Scoot is the name of the budget airline that provided an eleven-and-a-half-hour direct flight with food, water, blankets, or entertainment not provided but available to purchase. But it got us to and from Greece for under SGD550, so I’m not complaining.) Upon landing in Athens, my girlfriends and I switched terminals and then boarded our 45-minute flight to Santorini. (Olympic Air is a budget airline so we got those little cleansing towelettes and two snacks – Greek hospitality is just so lovely.) We were staying in Oia,  the town you probably picture of when you hear “Greece”. It is simply stunning.

Oia is pretty at night, too . . .

. . . and it has a fantastic bookstore, Atlantis Books, which we visited and purchased from twice. The exterior should give you a hint at the wonder of the interior. Books in all languages stacked floor to ceiling, hidden behind the staircase, and available to borrow and trade on the upstairs patio. Small signs and notes with suggestions from the bookstore employees. Just the best.

Watching the sunset is a popular activity in Oia, and considering how crowded the western part of town grew in October, I can’t even imagine how it would be during peak tourist season. It was cloudy every night, though only once during the day, so many of our fellow viewers were disappointed but I thought the clouds made for some really beautiful pictures. And just being there with good friends was easily the best part.

We took a few adventures from our first base in Oia. On our first full day, we spent five hours on a very fancy catamaran with a delightful crew, unlimited beverages, and delicious lunch. The weather was bright and sunny but slightly chilly so they even made us coffee!

We stopped at the hot springs, where I actually got into the very chilly water . . .

. . . the Red Beach . . .

DSC05193

. . . and the White Beach. Snorkeling was an option but it was cold! And I was perfectly happy to bask in the sunshine and chat with the crew. I miss being on boats.

The next day, we walked down the steps of Oia, from the top of the volcano to the water, to check out the seafood restaurants at Ammoudi Bay and go on our next adventure. I’m a vegetarian but one of my friends was really excited about the sun-drying octopus and booked us a seat for dinner at a restaurant that turned out to be delicious.

We waited at Ammoudi Bay for a ferry to take us across to Thirasia, another of Santorini’s islands. My brother recommended that we go and it was really cool to be able to share travel experiences and advice with him. He told us to walk up all the stairs . . .

DSC05344

. . . and eat at the restaurant at the top where an elderly man greeted us, singing and grilling fresh fish. So we did!

And then we wandered around town, which was eerily empty. It felt like a combination of an abandoned film set and a ghost town. In addition to the people running the restaurant, we saw three construction workers, one elderly woman, and another woman running the town’s only other restaurant (it was actually called Different Restaurant because it’s obviously not the one, but the different one). My pictures are a little weird and grainy, which accurately reflects the strangeness of the town but is actually because I mistakenly used the wrong setting.

The part of the town near the water was more like a boardwalk of restaurants and again, this was low tourist season. Empty.

Our last full day in Oia was probably my favorite day of the whole trip and that’s because it was the greatest adventure. It’s pretty common for travelers to hike the path between Fira, Santorini’s largest city on the eat side of the island, to Oia on the west. We’d read that the path is mostly downhill, not terribly strenuous, and difficult to lose. Great!

But not so when you go the other way! Of course, we learned this hiking the other way, from Oia to Fira, and it was challenging in parts, a little scary when we found ourselves on the side of a cliff in gusts of wind, and a little more scary when someone we couldn’t see started hunting birds. But we made it!

We left Oia at 7am, which is before the sun rises and before anything is open. It was so cool seeing the streets dark and empty, lit by streetlights.

There were some signs along the 10.5km route . . .

. . . but also a critical point that was difficult to navigate coming from Oia. Turns out we did have to go behind the desalination plant on the edge of the cliff. Found that out after realizing we were on a road curving the wrong way and had to hike up a hill behind a hotel to reorient ourselves. And then, under a menacing sky and loud gusts of wind, we traversed the beautiful, sometimes desolate wilderness that is the edge of the caldera.

No matter how tiny or empty the landscape, though, Greece has many churches . ..

. . . and their frequency increased as the hike became more urban. . . .

At times, the hike took us through resorts and villas, which was a little strange, but it was also comforting to see people. After a stop for breakfast and about four hours, we were delighted when we finally reached Fira!

Once in Fira, we found a taxi to take us a little further to Santorini Brewing Company, the only brewery in Santorini. They brew five beers and offer free tastings of three, which we enjoyed very much. And because I wanted to be able to say I’d had all of them, we bought bottles of the remaining two and sat outside the brewery (because it doesn’t have a liquor license) to drink them.

Afterwards, hungry from our hike and having made the acquaintance of the adorable kid on staff at the brewery, we asked for recommendations for lunch. He suggested Artemis Karamolegos Winery, a 5-minute walk down the road. The winery is beautiful, staff delightful, and food absolutely excellent. Best meal I’ve had in recent memory and the most full I’ve been in recent memory. And then they turned up with desserts and a digestif, which happened throughout our time in Greece. Truly an amazing country with wonderful people.

Finally, we decided it was time to return to Oia. Hiking the four hours back would have lost me two friends so we took the local bus first into Fira and then onto Oia. Forty minutes and keeping my friendships instead of four hours and losing them seemed worth it.

All in all, we loved our time in Santorini (and in Athens and Delphi). The people were wonderful, the food superb, and the wine plentiful. And it’s just gorgeous.

Creating Hospitable Spaces

I love books. I love books and independent bookstores and used bookstores. I love reading and learning. I love being challenged by what I’m learning, or feeling my horizons expand. I love getting so deep into the notes and references and traveling wherever they take me, to other books and other authors. I love when books I’ve read are sources for other books, when writers I respect mention other writers I respect.

It was that love that drew me to BooksActually last weekend, one of Singapore’s independent bookstores. BooksActually is particularly special because it also operates its own publishing house, making it the go-to destination for books that are truly Singaporean and might not have a significance audience elsewhere. This is where I found I Will Survive, an anthology of stories from Singapore’s LGBTQ community. While much in the book touched me, it was a line in the foreword that first got me thinking. Juliana Toh writes, “I was left thinking of Henri Nouwen’s book Reaching Out, in which relationships are viewed as contexts for the creation of hospitable experiences.” This particular way of defining relationships was new to me and I found the idea of “hospitable” really compelling. Maybe it was because we’d just started school and my students were on my mind, or maybe it was because I was reading about LGBTQ young people, but I immediately extrapolated from Toh’s statement and began to wonder what our schools would look like if we moved from creating “safe spaces” for young people to creating “hospitable spaces” instead.

Defining
The word “hospitable” has two definitions:

  1. friendly and welcoming to visitors or guests
  2. (of an environment) pleasant and favorable for living in

It seems reasonable that a hospitable space would inherently be a safe one because anywhere that is “pleasant and favorable for living in” implies safety. I think this idea fits really well in the context of school settings. After all, school is where young people spend most of their time and we know that we all do better when we feel comfortable.

Take a moment to consider what we want for the young people in our care. We want them to learn, to grow, to explore. We want them to feel good, at ease, and valued as individuals. We want them to connect to each other, to create, and to become their best selves. We want them to see and care for those around them and we want them to make the world a better, more peaceful place.

Doing this work requires that our students feel more than safe, which is currently what we tout as a goal for our schools and classrooms. A learning environment in which the above aims can be realized would be closer to “pleasant and favorable” than safe.

Rethinking
In my eight years teaching, my classroom has always been a place where students wander in and out during breaks and before school and where they stop by after school to chat about a variety of things. Like the rest of us, students spend time in places that they enjoy, places that are welcoming and pleasant and where they feel affirmed, or perhaps part of a community.

So what would schools look like if we explicitly focused on creating hospitable spaces rather than safe spaces? The biggest difference, I think, would be in the ways we approach students as individuals. The goal of safe spaces is to provide a protective, inclusive environment that embraces diversity on a range of levels. I wonder, though, what would happen if we started emphasizing the need for welcoming, pleasant spaces instead of merely safe ones. A space can be safe without being welcoming, pleasant, and favorable, but places that are favorable to us, places we want to be, will more than likely also be safe.

Imagining
As a reader, I’m a believer in the power of language. George Orwell’s 1984 does a better job illustrating this than I could, so I refer you there. Now, let’s pretend “hospitable space” was a common phrase used to talk about schools, an idea accepted and embraced by the school community.

Creating hospitable spaces would require all involved to treat one another, at the minimum, as individuals with dignity. It would require authentic communication and connection, which would foster an environment in which adults and young people work together towards common goals and in which each learns from and guides the other. A hospitable space would be positive, energizing, and a place where we all enjoy spending time. It would be flexible, open-ended, exploratory, creative. It would be a space where we grow as individuals and as a community, a space where we’d recognize first our common humanity and then the diversity that makes us each who we are.

Imagine the learning that would happen in this hospitable space.

Moving Forward
Of course, not all of us work in school and with students. But we all develop relationships with others, whether friends or colleagues or romantic partners. We all want to feel loved, affirmed, and valued. We want to grow and help others grow, to become better tomorrow than we are today.

All relationships take on colors, flavors, and textures. All relationships are built inside a metaphoric space. So let that space be hospitable. Let yourself be open to others. All of our lives are better when we can take a breath and know that someone else is doing the same.